Obama’s victory: was it because of the Latino votes?

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Obama’s victory: was it because of the Latino votes?

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With all of the surveys, statistics, percentages and overall numbers that were gathered that we now see the end result of all of those predictions, does it answer that lingering question everyone had in the back of their mind, of whether if the Latino Community is a sleeping giant? Well we can be all certain that it is a giant, but far from being asleep.

This past November 6th on Election Day that giant woke up and made its voice heard, validated its right to vote and yelled out its opinion.

For the first time in history the Latino vote may be seen as what has decided the direction in which the country will be taking, and could possibly be the majority who gave Obama the victory.

Mitt Romney’s strategy might have been the wrong one by thinking that he could still win without the Latino vote, a mistake he tried to rectify in the end, but by then it was too late.

Some surveys also determined that the illegal immigration issue was something real close to at least 60% of the Latinos who live in the United States legally.

Many of them either knew someone, has a family member or a friend who is living in the United States illegally, and that the immigration laws affected their family dynamics.

Maybe republicans in the near future will rethink of what position to take when it comes to immigration reforms, and join this movement along with the Democrats to create a reform which ultimately lead to citizenship.

This could almost be like a double edge sword for republicans as well, being that most of them are conservative and close minded about certain things, but of course there are those who are the exception as well.

In the last few surveys that were done right before Election Day, they predicted that the Latino support added up to about 70%, but on November 6th it was a big surprise to see that the actual figure came out to be 75%, which sets a new record for Obama as the president with the most Latino support in history, a record that was previously held by ex-president Bill Clinton with 72%.

Joy.Ruvalcaba@sandiegored.com

Omar.Martinez@sandiegored.com

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