Felipe Calderon goes to Harvard leaving behind a bloody mess

Thousands will wave goodbye with red handkerchiefs at his ceremony

Felipe Calderon goes to Harvard leaving behind a bloody messCourtesy Mexican Presidency.
Courtesy Mexican Presidency.

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MEXICO.- Hundreds of bloody handkerchiefs will be exposed symbolically in the capital this coming Saturday to wave goodbye to Mexican President Felipe Calderon (who is leaving soon to Harvard), which all of these handkerchiefs tell the story of the thousands of people that have died by all of the drug trafficking violence in the last six years.

"Embroidery is a reflexive act that makes you reflect whenever you are embroidering the name, when you're knitting you make it your own and the action humanizes the victim," Rosa Borras told Efe in an interview, who is also a member of the group "Embroidering for Peace" from the city of Puebla (central Mexico).

The handkerchiefs have four or five phrases that describe where and when the person died. “Our intention is to give the victims a voice and make them visible to everyone, so the thought of them just being another number or statistic is left behind and once again thought of as a person who has passed away and has left the family”, Borras explained.

“In many cases the families of the victims are not able to obtain any justice, because the justice system in Mexico just doesn’t work, and the only way the victims can have some sort of recognition is through these handkerchiefs, “said Borras.

Thanks to social media the movement “Embroidering for Peace” has come to play even in other countries like Chile, Argentina, Peru, which all also tell the stories of Mexico.

"There are Mexican and other people who simply have a great affection for Mexico and sympathize with our cause," said Elia Olea, who is also another member of this group.

The violence plaguing Mexico has claimed the lives of more than 50,000 people since December 2006, which is when Calderon first took office and launched an aggressive attack on the “War on Drugs” that involved thousands of Mexican soldiers.

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