Aaron Swartz link to Wikileaks and Assange is confirmed

It could be one of the reasons he was persecuted

Aaron Swartz link to Wikileaks and Assange is confirmedAaron Swartz. SanDiegoRed Services
Aaron Swartz. SanDiegoRed Services

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WikiLeaks confirmed through a series of tweets the relationship with Aaron Swartz, who was a young computer programmer who committed suicide last week after being pursued by the U.S. government for his activities on the internet and for sharing private information.

Now it is assumed that he may have been one of the informants for the agency led by Julian Assange, whom both were to believe to have been in communication.

Since WikiLeaks maintains the anonymity of their sources for protection, in one of the tweets it states "We have strong reasons to believe, although we cannot prove, that Aaron Swartz was a source of WikiLeaks".

It could be that this was one of the reasons that drove him to commit suicide.

Previously, it was only known that he was being persecuted for sharing documents from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and as of a result, he was looking at a sentence of 35 years in prison and a fine of one million dollars. But after his death the charges were dropped.

California Congresswoman, Zoe Lofgren, this past week created a bill which seeks to prevent cases like the one of Aaron Swartz from repeating again.

"We cannot reverse the tragedy of Aaron, but we can work to prevent the abuse of power that he went through.” she wrote in Reddit.

This law seeks to prevent the persecution by the government or the abuse of power when imposing sentences in such cases, where violations are made against a system or access to databases.

Zoe Lofgren Considers that the sentence the activist faced, was excessive and was compared to a similar sentence that would be given to a person who stole millions of dollars, or who simply violated the "Terms and Conditions" of a site. But this is completely legal thanks to the power of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) of 1984 and wire fraud statute.

*Click here to view Aaron’s bill

For his part, President of MIT, Rafael Reif issued a statement to the entire college community about the death of Aaron in which he said, "It pains me to think that MIT played any role in a series of events that have ended in tragedy." Reif also mentions that it was time to reflect on the actions of those who were involved in any event with Swartz. Previously the Swartz family had blamed MIT and the U.S. government for the death of this young computer programmer.

*Click here to view Rafael Reif statement

Brenda.Colon@sandiegored.com

Oliver.Vilchiz@buscacorp.com

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